New Life

National Poetry Month is around the corner. With it, spring, and Easter, I feel myself coming alive again. Hibernation is over. Sharpen the pencils. Let’s see what has germinated over the long winter.

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Book Review: Blood of the Fey

I’ve been remiss lately in posting, but I return with some book reviews of what I’ve read so far in my 2019 Goodreads Reading Challenge.

Blood of the FeyBlood of the Fey by Alessa Ellefson
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Let me preface my review by saying I love Arthurian legend stories, both traditional, contemporary, and influenced by, and I was excited by the title and premise of this one. I really wanted to like it. However, I found this book annoying after the first chapter or two. The premise of a contemporary underground Knights of the Round Table protecting the world from the Fey is good. I love the idea of this high school for pages, squires, and knights underneath Lake Winnebago in Wisconsin. However, the characterizations fall far short. Morgan is ostensibly a smart girl, but she never seems to learn anything about herself or her surroundings. Time and again, she expects different reactions from people than what they’ve ever given her before. And she never asks the the right questions. Most of her questions are one form or another of “why me?” When she goes to the secret school for knights, she refuses to believe anything anyone tells her about knights, fairies, and powers despite her classes and first hand knowledge. As she sees more, she seems to learn less. She continues to react as if none of it is real, and then is astonished by the results. She continues to flout the rules and regulations and takes them as a personal affront, and then is angry beyond thought when she is discovered. Had this happened once or twice and then had she learned to modify her behavior even just a little bit, her character would have been more believable and sympathetic.

I had almost forgotten about Morgan’s “guardian angel,” the voice she hears inside her head. He comes and goes with no regularity, so it is easy to forget about him. And he disappears from the story for chapters on end, especially at the end (like everyone else). Is he good or evil? Is he Catholic or Fey? Why does he abandon her for long stretches of time, particularly when she needs help most? What is the point of this character? Perhaps more will be revealed about him in future books in the series. I’ll never know

In addition, the way her friends and enemies seem to know all about her but share nothing with her is unrealistic. For example, her nemesis Daniel would surely throw her Fey connection in her face if indeed everyone knows as Irene contends. Her good friends Jack and Bri tell her almost nothing and cannot believe she doesn’t know anything about their world. I can believe that when she first arrives, but soon after, that line falls flat. They too should learn a little and realize that Morgan doesn’t know their rites and rituals. As for her roommate Keva, I still don’t understand why she would hang out with them at all after the first few moments when everyone would have to have realized that Morgan and Arthur do not have the best relationship. But, at least she is fairly true to her character of wanting to be near the “royalty” of the school throughout. And then all her friends pretty much disappear from the narrative.

Another inconsistency is that Morgan, who is not supposed to be on her own at all, goes off alone again and again. She fights person after creature after creature, breaking school rules all the while. This holds true for the genre, which I’d put as young adult fantasy than fantasy, but she learns nothing from each successive encounter. And her worst punishment for her flouting the rules is essentially “go to your room.” Then she faces the worst demons on her own–including one she, who believes nothing she is told about the school and has not even been in the school for a year, foretells returning yet the learned professors and knights cannot see the signs of.

Finally, the “twist” that is held back until the very end is no surprise at all, especially given the title. Morgan should gradually figure out her ancestry instead of continually whining that people don’t like her and life is unfair. The knights, professors, and other students should grow and learn from each other and from her as well.

Ultimately, the book was unsatisfying. There are too many gaps, inconsistencies, or unbelievable instances (and I do not mean fairies, power, or magic). I will not continue with the series which saddens me. I do love a good fantasy series, especially Arthurian.

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