Summer Book Stack

 

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Add in Educated by Tara Westover, which is on my Kindle…

This may be a bit ambitious for summer reading, but three of them are rereads, and I’m already halfway through the Deep Magic Anthology… and who knows, I may change my mind as the summer goes along. I’m already thinking that I may need to add in a Muirwood book too (but once I start those, I usually can’t stop!) Or a Clifton Chronicles. And some poetry, of course!

What are your reading plans this summer?

Do Crafts Have a Season?

I just posted a poll on the Facebook page for my Etsy shop asking friends what their favorite summer craft is. I did this because I have more time in the summer to craft, so I think of it as a time to create. I’ll be honest though, unless the air conditioner is on high, I prefer to save the yarn crafts for cooler weather! There’s nothing nicer than being halfway or more through a blanket on a cold winter evening. In the summer, I tend to turn more towards sewing.

Part of this may also be because I am a high school English teacher. During the school year, I use my crocheting as a way to unwind (unwind the mind while winding the yarn!); I sit in front of the TV with my hubby and crochet. It helps me let go of the hectic day so that my brain is ready for bed.

Sewing, on the other hand, I have to do while I am alert and focused. It is more exacting and fires up my brain rather than relaxes it. When I have off from work, it’s exciting to engage in a few projects during the day that charge my brain. I’m currently working on a sundress and have a plan to make some Roman shades too.

Writing is an all year activity, but I will admit that I do rachet up the hours during the summer. Teaching, planning, and especially grading can be exhausting, so I while I journal a lot and write some during the school year, less gets polished than I would like. During the summer, I can devote more time to “finishing” works.

Another all year activity, without the caveat, is painting. Our school’s annual art show is always in June (last weekend in fact). Then, we start again. Rain or shine I go, even in the snow if it isn’t too bad. And if it is, I might draw at home. Painting/drawing demands focus as well, but in a different way than sewing. I have to focus on what I’m seeing and put all the other random thoughts out of my head. I find it rather meditative and cleansing (even though my paint clothes might not show it!)

What about you? Do your crafts have a season?

Gardening Novice

A couple of years ago, my neighbors planted some lavender bushes; last year, they moved away. After hearing from our super that the new owner doesn’t plan to do anything with the garden, I spent some time this morning cutting away the dead branches. Two of the bushes were complete goners. I hope these come back a little.

I do not have a green thumb, but I do like the idea of gardening and the result of a pretty (and/or productive) garden. Maybe next week I’ll attack the upper level and clean it up. Then I can go to the nursery and figure out what to plant. It’s a little late in the season, but there must be something that’s okay for late June planting in the Northeast. I’ll ask.

In the meantime, at least it looks a little nicer. Too bad I didn’t think to take a before pic. The most important lesson I learned today though is simple. Gardening doesn’t have to consume the whole day. Even 25 minutes produces some result. Like most things, a little at a time gets the job done.

P.S. Anyone know what those green leafy plants in the front are?

Mrs. Dalloway Completion Paper

Mrs DallowayI assigned a “completion paper”to my students write immediately upon their finishing Mrs. Dalloway, that is, to write a stream-of-consciousness response to the novel. My directions were a bit more involved than that to help them get their feet wet, but that’s essentially it. And I did the same, even though this was not my first read. Here is my response.

And so, let me begin. Mrs. Dalloway. I still love this book. Why? There is a quietness to it and a profundity. It is life–1920s London life, yes, but still, that’s in the details. In the style and the philosophy, there is much that holds true. We are connected to each other by slender threads and odd instances of perchance. Like Sir William Bradshaw going to Clarissa’s party and bringing Septimus namelessly with him through his excuse for their tardiness. A perfectly reasonable occurrence. And Clarissa is deeply affected- first in anger and then in agitation, and finally in some sort of understanding. Yet, no one (other than the readers) will ever know that. Nor will they ever know that the death Sir Bradshaw so unknowingly facilitates and yet mourns as he brings it to Clarissa’s is the same one Peter hears the ambulance for which he heralds as a “one of the triumphs of civilization” (151)– which in this case is the opposite, isn’t it? Septimus’s death results from his experiences in war, the failure of civilization, and from the misguided efforts of Holmes and Bradshaw, another failure of civilization. As a reader, it is easy to dislike both Holmes and Bradshaw. Clarissa does not like Bradshaw, though she’s not sure why: Richard agrees with her, and Peter laughs about him and his wife with Sally, calling them “‘damnable humbugs’… looking at them casually” (193). Septimus obviously doesn’t like them; Rezia wants to trust them, but deep down I think she knows they are wrong. As a 21st century reader who has read/ seen much related to PTSD, it’s easy to see them as self important and dangerous. Their prescription for poor Septimus is all wrong. But, did you notice that when Sir Bradshaw and his wife enter the party, bringing death with them, he speaks to Richard about “the deferred effects of shell shock” (183)? Perhaps there’s a sliver of recognition under his pomposity? And, we must remember that we cannot label a character with a diagnosis that had not yet been invented–it’s too facile.

This is what I mean– or at least part of it. These characters are so real because the story is in their heads. We are intimately connected with them in ways they cannot even be connected with each other, but this ability to see the connections they don’t even know they have can, hopefully, help us understand that there is more to our relationships, even our most intimate ones, than we can ever know, and this understanding can help us, again hopefully, be more open and accepting of those around us and more alert to those slender threads. This is why I love Mrs. Dalloway. Or, at least it’s one reason, today’s reason.

This morning’s reason, before I had reached the end, had me musing on prejudice, racism, colonialism, and empire. Peter, having spent fifteen years in India, brings this to the forefront with his thoughts about England now that he has returned, though presumably not for good or is it?, and about India and what he has left behind. And then there are the other characters’ thoughts about him. Everyone seems to feel a little sorry for Peter, like he didn’t make the most of his talents and position–going to India is viewed as less than staying in England. And everyone seems to think–though they do not share it with each other–that he was essentially ruined by Clarissa’s rejection of him in favor of Richard Dalloway–an occurrence Peter himself has not gotten over, no matter how many times he tells himself that he does not love her anymore. Everyone, reader and character alike knows it, even Peter himself, for even though he claims to love Daisy, and in some way really does, he cannot forget Clarissa. However, it is the memory of her that he seems to love more than the actuality of Clarissa now.

I meant to write more about the racism, classism, and sexism exposed through Peter’s story and his love affair with Daisy, but Clarissa will not stay out of it any more than she can stay out of Peter’s thoughts. So, I invite you to join Clarissa as she heads off to buy her flowers and makes her way through her day. See what it is she stirs in you.