Book Review: Code Name Verity

Code Name Verity (Code Name Verity, #1)

This is the last Student-Faculty Book Club book of the year, and I have to admit that I didn’t really like the book at first. I didn’t hate it; I just found it only okay. Code Name Verity is a favorite of one of my students, and I just kept thinking, “why?”  The voice is not engaging; rather, it’s kind of whiny. But, in the second half, the Kitty Hawk half, the story picks up. Maddie’s voice, Kitty Hawk’s voice, is not only engaging but riveting despite her nearly constant blubbering. And, the twist makes the first half make sense; actually it’s a brilliant twist.

I read regularly on the train which means that I often have to close the book at inopportune moments. Usually, this leaves me itching to get back to the book as quickly as possible. With Code Name Verity, it was easy to close the book. I’d leave it for some time before getting back to it. Until the Kitty Hawk section. then, I didn’t want to put it down. As I neared the end, I read walking from the train and finished the the book on my couch at home. Maddie is quite the heroine and “Verity” is clever, even though she does not seem so at first. Stick it out through the “Verity” section; ultimately, the book is worth it.

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Practice What You Preach

I just participated in the most amazing teacher workshop, and all I want to do is write! Through The Academy for Teachers, I was lucky enough to be a part of a group of astute people discussing The Art of the Essay with Jeff Nunokawa from Princeton as our cheer leader and guide. Today was day 2 of 2. I wish there were more.

Last Sunday, I finally sat down to “do my homework” at the last minute, having carefully avoided it for ten days. I knew I wanted to revisit and revise a piece I’d started two years ago about my friend Harry, but I kept putting it off because I was tired, because I had papers to grade, because I had lessons to plan, because, because, because. Finally, I sat down, opened the file, and dug in. Two hours later my husband called to find out how I was doing. I was great! Writing had revived me from the lethargy of winter, the albatross of grading, and the oppression of procrastination.

The other part of our homework I completed this afternoon before the session began: reading essays written by the other teachers attending. Wow. They were powerful–and diverse in both content and style. I couldn’t wait to get there and begin!

And I was not disappointed. We discussed them with care and insight. There is something so exhilarating about intelligent conversation that seeks to understand and build up. This was no show of “how smart I am,” but rather “how good a writer are you”: Let’s discuss this personal, yet universal issue you brought up; let me tell you what I understand from your writing; you can tell me more about the topic or situation. And then, I’ll take note of what I can learn from this exchange, again in both content and style. Isn’t this what we should always be doing?

I am at my best when I do what I ask my students to do– read, write, discuss. So now even though I’m exhausted as I sit on the train home 15 hours after leaving there this morning, I’m writing, to you, and I hope you’ll write too. And we can learn together.

National Poetry Month

No fooling, April 1st begins National Poetry Month. I told my students on Monday that I didn’t care about April Fool’s Day, the important thing is that it is the beginning of National Poetry Month. I went on to explain how the NCAA-esque poetry brackets work. You see the NEHS is sponsoring a poem tournament for the month of April, school-wide. It’s a pretty ambitious project. Fingers crossed it goes well with a lot of participation. (More on this later; stay tuned.)

But appreciation is only half of the NPM coin for us writers and poets. So once again, I’m trying my hand at Writer’s Digest’s Poem-A Day Challenge. It’s really good exercise for one’s creative muscle to commit to writing every day, and so many do it regularly. For me, it’s fits and starts. I go for stretches when I write regularly, let’s say five out of seven if not every day, but then… something happens that gets me off track. April and the Poem-a-Day Challenge are a great way to get back in the groove.

So, you may have noticed, this is not a poem. But as the wee hours of April 1st wore away, I scribbled down a few lines in response to the day’s prompt: write a morning poem. And as I write this, another angle for this prompt springs to mind. I may not post every day to give myself time for review and revise, but the aim is to write. I’ll keep at it. I hope you do too. Happy National Poetry Month.

Book Review: Blood of the Fey

I’ve been remiss lately in posting, but I return with some book reviews of what I’ve read so far in my 2019 Goodreads Reading Challenge.

Blood of the FeyBlood of the Fey by Alessa Ellefson
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Let me preface my review by saying I love Arthurian legend stories, both traditional, contemporary, and influenced by, and I was excited by the title and premise of this one. I really wanted to like it. However, I found this book annoying after the first chapter or two. The premise of a contemporary underground Knights of the Round Table protecting the world from the Fey is good. I love the idea of this high school for pages, squires, and knights underneath Lake Winnebago in Wisconsin. However, the characterizations fall far short. Morgan is ostensibly a smart girl, but she never seems to learn anything about herself or her surroundings. Time and again, she expects different reactions from people than what they’ve ever given her before. And she never asks the the right questions. Most of her questions are one form or another of “why me?” When she goes to the secret school for knights, she refuses to believe anything anyone tells her about knights, fairies, and powers despite her classes and first hand knowledge. As she sees more, she seems to learn less. She continues to react as if none of it is real, and then is astonished by the results. She continues to flout the rules and regulations and takes them as a personal affront, and then is angry beyond thought when she is discovered. Had this happened once or twice and then had she learned to modify her behavior even just a little bit, her character would have been more believable and sympathetic.

I had almost forgotten about Morgan’s “guardian angel,” the voice she hears inside her head. He comes and goes with no regularity, so it is easy to forget about him. And he disappears from the story for chapters on end, especially at the end (like everyone else). Is he good or evil? Is he Catholic or Fey? Why does he abandon her for long stretches of time, particularly when she needs help most? What is the point of this character? Perhaps more will be revealed about him in future books in the series. I’ll never know

In addition, the way her friends and enemies seem to know all about her but share nothing with her is unrealistic. For example, her nemesis Daniel would surely throw her Fey connection in her face if indeed everyone knows as Irene contends. Her good friends Jack and Bri tell her almost nothing and cannot believe she doesn’t know anything about their world. I can believe that when she first arrives, but soon after, that line falls flat. They too should learn a little and realize that Morgan doesn’t know their rites and rituals. As for her roommate Keva, I still don’t understand why she would hang out with them at all after the first few moments when everyone would have to have realized that Morgan and Arthur do not have the best relationship. But, at least she is fairly true to her character of wanting to be near the “royalty” of the school throughout. And then all her friends pretty much disappear from the narrative.

Another inconsistency is that Morgan, who is not supposed to be on her own at all, goes off alone again and again. She fights person after creature after creature, breaking school rules all the while. This holds true for the genre, which I’d put as young adult fantasy than fantasy, but she learns nothing from each successive encounter. And her worst punishment for her flouting the rules is essentially “go to your room.” Then she faces the worst demons on her own–including one she, who believes nothing she is told about the school and has not even been in the school for a year, foretells returning yet the learned professors and knights cannot see the signs of.

Finally, the “twist” that is held back until the very end is no surprise at all, especially given the title. Morgan should gradually figure out her ancestry instead of continually whining that people don’t like her and life is unfair. The knights, professors, and other students should grow and learn from each other and from her as well.

Ultimately, the book was unsatisfying. There are too many gaps, inconsistencies, or unbelievable instances (and I do not mean fairies, power, or magic). I will not continue with the series which saddens me. I do love a good fantasy series, especially Arthurian.

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No Time to Read? Read This!

In our busy, busy world, some people find it hard to find the time to read. While I can’t understand this personally, I can help them out! Recently, I took on a challenge to write 18 word stories. It was a challenge to get a story arc into just 18 words, but the experience was fun. Even though I didn’t win publication, I enjoyed the writing. I hope you enjoy these micro-micro-minis: something to read when there’s no time!

1. Warning Sign

The wheelbarrow tilted against the barn door told Norah the drought continued. Sven would be hungry again tonight.

2. Love on the Dice

The deliberate way he counted the Yahtzee dice showed Milo that James might yet make a good husband.

3. Velveteen’s Nephew

The polka-dotted bunny slipped his bonds and tumbled away from her homespun dress: looking for love, finding mud.

4. Inspiration

“Down the rabbit hole,” Lewis swore as he watched his prized marble disappear. Suddenly, he had an idea!

Writing/Not Writing

I haven’t written much here lately, but I’ve been writing. Sort of. Or well, rather I’ve been starting many things. You see, I’ve started having my students draft and free write on a more regular basis this year, and I’ve been writing alongside them. We respond to poetry and prose and sometimes simple statements or questions. Sometimes, I share my work with them; sometimes I do not. I want them to value their own thoughts, so I do not default to sharing with them first. I let them share their ideas. But I do let them see me write, and every so often, I put something I scribbled out with them up on the Smart Board and let them see me do some preliminary revisions.–More of a “this is how revision is done” thing than a “this is what I think about the topic” thing–They can see me write and hear my words without me telling them that this is what one should think about this topic. It’s still early, so it’s hard to tell how well it’s working with their writing, but I do know that they are not as reticent about writing as they were in the beginning of the year because they are seeing it as a class work activity rather than a big assessment. That in and of itself is the beginning of a win.

As for me and my writing, this activity has left me with the beginnings of many pieces and ideas jotted down for others. Despite the fact that the real season is autumn, it feels like spring in my writing life–planting seeds that I hope will germinate and come to fruition. I hope you don’t feel neglected, and I hope you’ll stay with me through the planting season and will be around to see what has grown.

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A Walk in the Park

Today, I took my first walk through the park for this school year. Immediately upon entering, there was a jazz trio greeting me.

Then, around the corner, the Alice in Wonderland statue was, for once, not teeming with children and tourists, allowing me to snap a photo.

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And the pond was full of sailboats.

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Next, coming around the corner by the boat house, I ran across a student with her boyfriend lagging five steps behind. She seemed rather embarrassed when I said, “hi” as I passed.  I smiled.

And the smiling continued as I came into Belvedere fountain which was positively glistening in the sun.

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I took all of this as a very good omen. “It’s going to be a good year,” I thought. But then, I exited the park and discovered that the subway station is under construction.

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Two more long avenues to the next subway was not the way I wanted to end this glorious walk. Oh well, it was still lovely in the park.